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  • Breed: Spitz
  • Group: Working
  • Height:
  • Weight:
  • HypoAllergenic: No
  • Coat: Thick, long, double coat
  • Activity:
  • With Children:
  • With Animals:
  • Grooming:
  • Guard:
  • Trainability:

SPITZ PUPPIES FOR SALE

Are you looking for Spitz puppies for sale? 

Check out our Spitz puppies for sale below! 

Spitz is the name of a group of dog breeds. These breeds originated in Scandinavia, Russia, North America, and Asia. The word ?Spitz? is German for ?pointed? and Spitz dogs have triangular, pointed ears. 

If you?ve ever seen a Pomeranian, Siberian Husky, Samoyed, or Shiba Inu, you?ve seen a Spitz dog

There are an estimated 50-70 breeds in the Spitz group. Some breeds don?t have exact standards which makes it hard to identify their breed. Many of these breeds are simply called ?Spitz dogs?.  

Browse our Spitz puppies for sale, and bring home your new best friend for life!

Are you looking for Spitz puppies for sale?

Check out our Spitz puppies for sale below!

Spitz is the name of a group of dog breeds. These breeds originated in Scandinavia, Russia, North America, and Asia. The word “Spitz” is German for “pointed” and Spitz dogs have triangular, pointed ears.

If you’ve ever seen a Pomeranian, Siberian Husky, Samoyed, or Shiba Inu, you’ve seen a Spitz dog!

There are an estimated 50-70 breeds in the Spitz group. Some breeds don’t have exact standards which makes it hard to identify their breed. Many of these breeds are simply called “Spitz dogs”.

Browse our Spitz puppies for sale, and bring home your new best friend for life!

Since the term “Spitz” covers a wide range of dog breeds it’s difficult to nail down a specific temperament. However, most Spitz dogs share these common traits:

Build for the Cold: Spitz dogs originated in very cold climates and have thick, fluffy coats to keep them warm in harsh, cold weather.

Curled Tail:
Many of the Spitz dogs have tails that curl over their back. This helps them keep their body heat in harsh climates.

Wolf or Fox-Like Appearance:
Have you ever seen a dog that looked liked a wolf? You may have seen an Alaskan Malamute, Norwegian Buhund, Norwegian Elkhound, or Siberian Husky! These Spitz breeds resemble wolves.

Other Spitz breeds, such as the Akita, Shiba Inu, and Finnish Spitz look like foxes.

Then there’s the Chow Chow, Pomeranian, Japanese Spitz, and American Eskimo Dog: they just look like loveable teddy bears!

Independent:
Spitz breeds are often intelligent, bold, and independent. They are not always the best dogs for first-time dog owners. They were bred to work and love to be kept busy.

Loyal:
Spitz dogs bond deeply with their owners and many Spitz breeds are protective of their family and make good watchdogs.
Check out this list of 40 Spitz breeds for more details about this amazing group of dogs!

Spitz dogs originate from northern regions including Scandinavia, Russia, Asia, and North America.

Spitz dogs have a vast and varied history: the Chow Chow is one of the most ancient dogs breeds and the Alaskan Malamute is a descendant of domesticated wolves!

While we can’t detail each breed’s history here, below is a list of roles that Spitz dogs have held over the centuries.

Historical Roles of Spitz Dogs

  • Hunters of boar, bear, deer, seals, puffin, and more
  • Reindeer and livestock herders
  • Guardians of homes, farms, boats, etc.
  • All-purpose farm dogs
  • Shipmates and pillaging companion to Vikings
  • Sled dogs; some haulers, others racers
  • Fisherman’s dogs
  • Circus dogs
  • Barge dogs
  • Companions to peasants, Chinese emperors, and Queen Victoria

Spitz dogs have been working with and providing loving companionship to humans for centuries!

Spitz dogs come in a vast variety of sizes!

For example, the Pomeranian weighs just 3-7 pounds, while the male Akita can weigh up to 130 pounds!

We recommend contacting the breeder of the puppy you are interested in to see what size they will be as an adult dog.

With so many varying breeds within the Spitz family, designating a specific lifespan is impossible.

Check with the breeder of the puppy you are interested in to determine an estimated lifespan.

Spitz breeds are known for their pointed ears, almond-shaped eyes, pointed snouts, and tails that curl over their backs. They also have thick, fluffy coats.

Spitz dogs have a wide range of coat colors and markings as well as sizes.

The Pomeranian weighs just 3-7 pounds, while the male Akita can weigh up to 130 pounds!

Spitz dogs have thick double coats and need thorough brushing a few times a week and more often during shedding season.

Plan to buy some good grooming tools such as a slicker brush, coat rake, or pin brush. Ask your vet or dog breeder what grooming tools they recommend for your breed of Spitz Dog.

Some Spitz breeds are very clean and only need to be bathed a few times a year! Other Spitz breeds will need to be bathed every 6-8 weeks. Ask your vet what they recommend for your Spitz puppy.

Your Spitz dog will also need its nails trimmed and teeth brushed regularly.

While health conditions vary from breed to breed within the Spitz group, some conditions can affect any dog and it’s essential for all dog owners to be aware of them.

Hip and Elbow Dysplasia
All dog breeds are at risk for hip and elbow dysplasia, two of the most common health issues in dogs.

Hip and elbow dysplasia occurs when the thigh bone doesn’t fit snugly into the hip and can result in limping, lameness, or arthritis if it’s not addressed.

Hip and elbow dysplasia can be genetic, or it can be caused by environmental factors such as overeating or injuries.
Here are some ways to prevent hip dysplasia in your puppy:

  1. Ask the breeder for an OFA (Orthopedic Foundation for Animals) Hip Clearance. Dogs with hip dysplasia shouldn’t be bred.
  2. Talk to your vet about the right food for your puppy and stick to the correct amount to prevent unhealthy growth.
  3. Keep your puppy from running or jumping excessively on hard surfaces and from standing on their hind legs.

Dog Bloat: A Medical Emergency
Bloat, also called gastric dilatation-volvulus or gastric torsion, especially affects large breed dogs and is a life-threatening condition.

Bloat happens when the stomach becomes twisted and the gases in the stomach are unable to escape. The pressure from these gases affects the blood flow to the heart, and it can be fatal.

To prevent bloat:

  1. Avoid feeding your dog right before or after heavy exercise.
  2. Feed them a few smaller meals a day instead of one large meal to prevent bloat.
  3. Learn to recognize the symptoms of bloat so you can take action immediately.

Some owners choose to have surgery done to tack their dog’s stomach in place and prevent it from twisting.

Protect Your Dog from Obesity

You can protect your dog from one of the most common health problems: obesity. One of the best ways to extend your dog’s life is by feeding them the correct amount of food and giving them adequate exercise.

First of all, what causes allergies?

Allergens are caused by dander, which is dead skin cells. Both animals and humans shed these dead skin cells. Dander is attached to the fur that dogs shed.

Spitz dogs are heavy shedders and are not considered an allergen-friendly breed. Allergens can be lowered with regular brushing and bathing.

If you or someone in your home has animal allergy concerns, please consult your health provider before adopting a Spitz puppy.